Researchers identify four new genetic suspects as being relevant to the development of meningiomas (January 2013)

An international team of researchers has identified four new genetic suspects to add to the already-identified neurofibromin 2 as being relevant to the development of meningiomas. This may lead to personalised medical therapies for meningiomas which currently are primarily managed surgically. See below for abstract of their article in the journal Science published January 2013.

“We report genomic analysis of 300 meningiomas, the most common primary brain tumors, leading to the discovery of mutations in TRAF7, a proapoptotic E3 ubiquitin ligase in nearly one-fourth of all meningiomas. Mutations in TRAF7 commonly occurred with a recurrent mutation (K409Q) in KLF4, a transcription factor known for its role in inducing pluripotency, or with AKT1E17K, a mutation known to activate the PI3K pathway. SMO mutations, which activate Hedgehog signaling, were identified in ~5% of non-NF2 mutant meningiomas. These non-NF2 meningiomas were clinically distinctive—nearly always benign, with chromosomal stability, and originating from the skull base. In contrast, the vast majority of atypical meningiomas were NF2-mutant, showing genomic instability and localizing to the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. Collectively, these findings identify distinct meningioma subtypes, suggesting novel avenues for targeted therapeutics.”

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About mycharityshoplife

Mummy to Isabella. Head of Member Services at the Charity Retail Association and Trustee/Website Manager at Meningioma UK. Shoegazer. Impulsive charity shopper and fastidious declutterer - one cancels the other out.
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